Reviews of Moonlight and Misadventure!

Greetings Readers!

Delighted to report that Judy Penz Sheluk’s latest anthology, Moonlight and Misadventure, is getting great reviews.

Kevin Tipple author, reviewer and long-time executive of the Short Mystery Fiction Society writes:

From the complicated and powerful opening tale to the twist ending in the last one, the twenty stories in the book are all good ones. Moonlight as well as misadventure in a variety of ways plays a major role in all of them. So does more than a hint of madness in many of the tales. In some cases, things happened as they always would because of the nature of the folks involved. In others, the plan failed sometimes in surprising ways…Every tale selected is a good one and well worth your time.

Moonlight earns 5 orbs out of 5 at King’s River Life Magazine.  Reviewer Kathleen Costa calls the collection of stories “fascinating and clever”. And about my story, “The Moon God of Broadmoor”, she wrote: Endearing story but don’t forget a box of tissues.

Moon God also has a shout-out from reviewer, Victoria Weisfeld:

Of considerable charm was MH Callway’s “The Moon God of Broadmoor.” A public health inspector engaged in a clean-up campaign allies with a resident of the Broadmoor apartments who styles himself Thoth, God of the Moon. A chubby, middle-aged man, he routinely dresses in a powder blue tunic, shiny mauve tights, and gauzy iridescent cape. “I see that I have struck awe in your heart,” he says to the inspector when she first spots him. As the two become more acquainted, she finds that, although he’s certainly eccentric, he makes a substantial contribution to his community too. He’s unhinged, unforgettable, and more than a little help in her campaign.

Author and reviewer, Vanessa Westermann, gave Moonlight a warm review and Moon God a special mention. Vanessa writes:

Spanning the sub-genres of crime fiction, Moonlight & Misadventure illuminates the darker side of human nature that comes out at night. The moonbeams these authors cast on nefarious deeds are sure to dazzle readers of short stories.

And from Coast Reporter, who found the anthology ” a lively read – without the worst of gore and graphic violence”.

And no book would be complete without a reference to Thoth, the moon god, (aka Stanley) in M.H. Callway’s story, “The Moon God of Broadmoor.”

Fellow authors, I believe we have a hit!

 

Moonlight and Misadventure now available!!

Greetings Readers!

Today is the day:  Moonlight and Misadventure, the latest anthology edited by Judy Penz Sheluk (Superior Shores Press) is available on Amazon in ebook and print! Get it here: link.

I’m delighted to have my dark tale, “The Moon God of Broadmoor”, included with the works of  20+ amazing writers.

We’ve been getting  great reviews, including a 4.7 star rating on Goodreads. Read American writer/editor Kevin Tipple’s review on his blog, Kevin’s Corner, here. And Canadian writer/reviewer, Vanessa Westermann’s take, here.

Earlier in June, I had the privilege of being featured on Art Taylor’s blog, The First Two Pages, where I revealed the craft behind the opening of “Moon God”. Also the challenges I faced moving from scientific and bureaucratic writing to creating crime fiction! Here’s the link.

Here’s  an excerpt from my story,  “The Moon God of Broadmoor”!

Liz, a young public health inspector, visits the Broadmoor Apartments to investigate a complaint about poop on the lawn.

I parked illegally in front of the building. From where I sat in the driver’s seat, I could see that Mrs. Jack had ample cause to complain.  The grass was befouled.

Step one, find Mrs. Jack. I climbed out of the van, but couldn’t spot the entrance to the building. Now what?

My answer came in the form of an apparition: a chubby, middle-aged man wearing a powder blue tunic, shiny mauve tights and gauzy, iridescent cape.

He emerged from a doorway located in the bend of the “U” on my right and sauntered down the fractured cement path that bisected the lawn. He stopped just in front of me.

“I see that I have struck awe in your heart. Don’t be afraid,” he said.

“Excuse me?”

“I am Thoth, God of the Moon. How may I help you?”

A large brooch, in the shape of a pink rhinestone flamingo, pinned the ends of his cape to the front of his tunic. His stringy black hair badly needed a wash, but his broad face looked friendly.

          Best to play along.  “Nice to meet you, um, Thoth. I seek Mrs. Jack.”

 “Ah, yes, the keeper of my earthly home. And what is your business with her?”

          “I’m with the health department. Mrs. Jack made a complaint.”

 “Sad.” Thoth shook his head. “So young and already ensnared in the satanic coils of bureaucracy. You will find Mrs. Jack through there.”

 

 

CYBER CAFE: Meet Bethany Maines, Fellow Author in Moonlight and Misadventure

Bethany Maines

Greetings Readers!

Only one more week till the  publication of Moonlight and Misadventure on June 18th! Today it’s my pleasure to welcome fellow author, Bethany Maines to Cyber Cafe.  We both share a love for and write noir crime fiction and readers will really enjoy her dark tale, Tammy Loves Derek.

Bethany is an award-winning author of romantic action-adventure and mystery novels that focus on women who know when to apply lipstick and when to apply a foot to someone’s hind-end. She has published several independent novels, two novels with Atria, and numerous short stories in Frolic, Shotgun Honey, and Switchblade Magazine. When she’s not traveling to exotic lands, or kicking some serious butt with her black belt in karate, she can be found chasing her daughter or glued to the computer working on her next novel.

Tammy Loves Derek is a wonderfully dark and scary tale. What inspired you to write it?

I participate in the Seattle Noir at the Bar a few times a year. Noir at the Bar is a live reading event focusing on crime fiction and every time I attend I’m inspired to up my game. Every writer’s take on noir is a little different, but at our January 2020 event, someone made a crack about femme fatales. That got me thinking about writing a crime story from the “bad girl’s’” point of view.

I set out to write such a story planning to read it at our next Noir at the Bar event.  Unfortunately, COVID hit, and in-person events were canceled. I had to start looking for a new home for it. I was thrilled when I saw the announcement for Moonlight and Misadventure – I was certain my story would fit in.

And it certainly does! Tell us more about Tammy Loves Derek.

Tammy Loves Derek centers on Tammy Lee Swanley. She has a stable job at a med spa, but she also has a cheating boyfriend and dwindling prospects for getting the gold-plated life she was hoping for. So Tammy comes up with five-step plan for wealth and happiness. Hint: that plan might not include her boyfriend, Derek!

What do you especially enjoy about being part of the Moonlight and Misadventure anthology?

I love the team effort of being part of anthology. It’s nice to work with other authors and I can’t wait to read all of the stories.

Tell us more about your writing. Do you write short fiction or novels or both?

I write both novels and short fiction. Of the two, I find short fiction to be the harder one!  Short fiction has to contain so much within such tight parameters. Every word starts to matter!

You love to explore sub-genres in crime fiction. Tell us more!

I have one crime series – The Shark Santoyo Crime Series – which is a bit of a mobster mash-up and my homage to those fast moving pulp reads of old.  But I usually write mysteries and what I would call “women’s action-adventure”. My novels are fast-paced, funny, female-driven yarns that keep the reader turning pages. I delve a bit in Romantic Suspense (Oooh! Naked kissing parts!), but we’re not hanging around to stare dreamily into each other’s eyes – there are more people who need to be punched in the face!

My short fiction, however, tends to be straight crime. I don’t know why, but my stories all involve murder, robbery, and/or mayhem. That may say something about my personality, but I’m choosing not to speculate!

How did you become a writer? 

I always wrote when I was a kid, but a high-school English teacher told me that I wasn’t very creative. I thought that meant that I probably wasn’t a very good writer, but Simon & Schuster disagreed with her, so she can pretty much suck it. (No kidding!) But I guess my point is that I didn’t think writing was something I could do until after college. That’s when I really started to attack it as something more than a hobby or something I did for my own entertainment.

That’s really inspiring, Bethany! Be sure to visit Bethany on her website:  https://bethanymaines.com

Follow her on: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AuthorBethanyMaines Instagram: @AuthorBethanyMaines ; Twitter: @BethanyMaines

 

About Moonlight & Misadventure: Whether it’s vintage Hollywood, the Florida everglades, the Atlantic City boardwalk, or a farmhouse in Western Canada, the twenty authors represented in this collection of mystery and suspense interpret the overarching theme of “moonlight and misadventure” in their own inimitable style where only one thing is assured: Waxing, waning, gibbous, or full, the moon is always there, illuminating things better left in the dark.

Release date: June 18, 2021 in all e-book formats and trade paperback on Amazon and at all the usual suspects.

 

 

CYBER CAFE: Meet Clark Boyd, Fellow Author in Moonlight and Misadventure

Clark Boyd

Greetings Readers!

Exciting news: it’s already June and in  a little more than two weeks time, the  publication of Moonlight and Misadventure on June 18th. 

I’m delighted to welcome fellow author, Clark Boyd to Cyber Cafe. Clark  lives and works in the Netherlands. His fiction and essays have appeared in High Shelf Press, Havok, Scare Street, Fatal Flaw Magazine, and various DBND Publishing horror anthologies. He is currently at work on a book about windmills. Or cheese. Maybe both!

Clark’s wickedly twisted sense of humor makes his story “Battle of the Jerrell Twins” such a great read.

Tell us about the Jerrell Twins. No spoilers!

When I was younger, I owned a 1967 Ford Mustang, fire-engine red just like the one in my story. The truth is that it once belonged to my grandmother, who only drove it back and forth to work. My abiding memory of that car is that it reeked of her cigarettes no matter what I did to get rid of the smell. Also, in an earlier draft of the story, I referenced a little horse-shaped hood ornament that I could have sworn sat on the hood of that car — in the center, right at the front. (Gleaming in the moonlight, of course!) But I had to take that detail out because, as my father insisted, 1967 Mustangs didn’t come with hood ornaments. Dads can be such buzzkills.

What gave you the idea for the crazy idiot Jerrells? 

In high school, I knew a kid whose dad was a dentist.  On a regular basis he kept a canister of nitrous oxide in his car, and bragged about how he lifted it from his father’s office. I remember watching in awe as he and his buddies took hits off that bottle before school. I’d never heard anyone laugh with such delicious fun and reckless abandon before. Or since, for that matter. At some point, I think the kid wrapped his car around a tree or drove it into a K-Mart or something. I always dreamed of finding some way to weave this madness into a story. “Misadventure” seemed to fit.

What do you especially enjoy about being part of Moonlight and Misadventure?

I love the conceit of it more than anything. I had been working on this story for a few months, and it had gone through a lot of tweaks as I sent it off to different places. But when I saw what Judy was looking for in Moonlight and Misadventure, the whole thing coalesced and gave me the frame I needed to tell the story right.

Tell us more about your writing. Do you prefer writing short fiction or novels or both?

I spent twenty years reporting, writing, and editing radio scripts for an international news program called The World, which still airs daily on the US public radio network. When I left that life behind and moved with my family to the Netherlands, I figured it was time to try something new. I’ve been dabbling in short fiction and essays ever since, with an eye toward eventually trying a novel. Maybe it’s no surprise, given the fact that I wrote so long for the ear and not the eye, that I enjoy crafting dialogue more than just about anything else.

What genres appeal to you? 

“The Ballad of the Jerrell Twins” is my first crime fiction story. Most of what I’ve written best fits into the horror category, although I tend away from gore and lean toward stories with a psychological twist. No matter what I write, I try to infuse it with humor and not take it too seriously.  Perhaps that’s why I don’t have much luck getting any “literary fiction” published.

How did you become a writer? Did you know from childhood or did you decide later in life?

I knew from a very young age that I wanted to write. One of my earliest elementary school memories is winning a prize for some (extremely) short story I wrote in second grade. Later in life, one of the main reasons I became a radio journalist was because I could get paid (poorly) to write on a daily basis. That said, I can’t say that trying to switch gears and write fiction at the age of 50 is the best career move I’ve ever made…

Well, we disagree! Learn more about Clark and his writing here

WebsiteSlaughterhouse SketchesJourneys into the Dutch Heart and Soul (wpcomstaging.com)

Twitter: @clark_boyd

About Moonlight & Misadventure:

Whether it’s vintage Hollywood, the Florida everglades, the Atlantic City boardwalk, or a farmhouse in Western Canada, the twenty authors represented in this collection of mystery and suspense interpret the overarching theme of “moonlight and misadventure” in their own inimitable style where only one thing is assured: Waxing, waning, gibbous, or full, the moon is always there, illuminating things better left in the dark.

 

Release date: June 18, 2021 in all e-book formats and trade paperback on Amazon and all the usual suspects.

 

 

 

NEWS: Moonlight and Misadventure Cover Reveal!

Greetings Readers!

Here’s the promised cover reveal for the upcoming anthology, Moonlight & Misadventure, edited by the tireless Judy Penz Sheluk. The cover designer is Hunter Martin who created the look for her first two anthologies, The Best Laid Plans and Heartbreaks and Half-truths.

I’m delighted that my story, “The Moon God of Broadmoor”, is one of 20 stories in this collection. The official publication date is June 18th, but you may pre-order it at Amazon here.

Also a privilege to be part of Joanna Van der Vlugt’s  podcast together with Judy, Karen Abrahamson, Susan Daly, Elizabeth Elwood and Susan Jane Wright.  Recorded in April, it’s scheduled to be broadcast in July.

For a behind the scene look at the making of a podcast, read Judy Penz Sheluk’s blog here.

 

 

EAT THIS BOOK: Forgotten Writers #8 – Robert Ray – Murdock PI Series

More shelf clearing, Readers!

Next up: Murdock for Hire, Book 2 in the hard-boiled PI series by Robert Ray,   featuring boat- building private eye,  Matt Murdock.

Author Robert Ray is a pretty cool guy.  Born in Texas in 1935, which makes him 86 years old, he describes himself as “author, teacher, dangerous thinker”.  In university he majored in languages, learning Russian, Chinese and Hindustani!  He bagged a PhD and has spent his professional life teaching writing at the college level.

Penguin published Ray’s first books in the Murdock series from the late 1980s to the early 1990s. I remember their witty titles: Bloody Murdock, Dial M for Murdock, Merry Christmas Murdock and Murdock Cracks Ice.  Then there’s a 20 year gap before the next two books in the series: Murdock Tackles Taos (2012) and Murdock Rocks Sedona (2015). Also a change of venue from California to New Mexico and a change in publishers to Camel Press Publishing  a mid-list publisher of genre fiction located in Washington State.

So what happened?  A familiar and unhappy scenario for many writers.  They publish a series of books then the publisher drops them because (a) their editor and in-house champion left the company or (b) the books didn’t sell quite enough. Quality doesn’t count, not even Hammett nominations, only biz revenues.  Authors’ careers increasingly resemble the business curves of  commodities.

So what happened to Ray in the intervening 20 years? Quite a lot as it turned out.

He returned to his teaching roots and with co-author, Bret Norris, created The Weekend Novelist, a step-by-step manual for wannabe authors busy with their day jobs.  It proved to be such a huge success that Ray went on to write two more follow-ups: The Weekend Novelist Writes a Mystery with his friend, Jack Remick as well as  The Weekend Novelist Rewrites the Novel.  Ray believes that  the books have taught more than 10,000 people how to write!

Ray also wrote a standalone thriller, The Hitman Cometh as well as several business texts and a book on tennis.

Today, with the help of Jack Remick, he maintains a vibrant blog on his website. Every Tuesday and Friday they write together at Louisa’s Bakery and Cafe in Seattle, a city where he and his wife live with three cats…so far.

I like this guy!!

Re-reading the opening chapters of Murdock for Hire, I’m struck by Ray’s spare, journalistic prose,  which zips you through the pages. The subject matter is pure “Wolf of Wall Street” stuff. Hapless businessman Eddie Hennessey tries the kinky sex and drugs of an exclusive hookers’ club and ends up unpleasantly dead. Murdock, who more than a little resembles Travis McGee (he loves boats and hot women), is asked to investigate.  It’s an enjoyable pulp read, the same but different.

BOTTOM LINE:   My copy of Murdock for Hire  is paperback, not first edition.  Prices on Abe Books, Amazon and Biblio range from $2 to $6.  Thierry value: $11.30US*

DECISION: Donate to Little Library

*Thierry value = most outrageous price you can humanly get away with. Named in honor of Mr. Brainwash who sold old used T-shirts for $500+. (See Banksy’s documentary, Exit through the Gift Shop.)

 

 

 

NEWS: Moonlight and Misadventure Coming June 18th

Greetings Readers!

My latest story, “The Moon God of Broadmoor”, is one of 20+ crime fiction tales in the anthology, Moonlight and Misadventure, edited by the indefatigable Judy Penz Sheluk (Superior Shores Press).  Publication date is June 18th.

Moonlight and Misadventure

Stand by for the cover reveal, which will happen in the next few weeks!

Several of the authors, including myself, will be part of west coast author,  Joanna Van der Vlugt’s  podcast to be recorded on April 17th. Looking forward to that!

Here’s a sneak peak of the back cover:

“Whether it’s vintage Hollywood, the Florida everglades, the Atlantic City boardwalk, or a farmhouse in Western Canada, the twenty authors represented in this collection of mystery and suspense interpret the overarching theme of “moonlight and misadventure” in their own inimitable style where only one thing is assured: Waxing, waning, gibbous, or full, the moon is always there, illuminating things better left in the dark.”

Featuring stories by K.L. Abrahamson, Sharon Hart Addy, C.W. Blackwell, Clark Boyd, M.H. Callway, Michael A. Clark, Susan Daly, Buzz Dixon, Jeanne DuBois, Elizabeth Elwood, Tracy Falenwolfe, Kate Fellowes, John M. Floyd, Billy Houston, Bethany Maines, Judy Penz Sheluk, KM Rockwood, Joseph S. Walker, Robert Weibezahl, and Susan Jane Wright.

 

EAT THIS BOOK: Forgotten Writers #7 – Stephen Paul Cohen

Back to clearing my book shelves, Readers!

Next up: two books by Stephen Paul Cohen, featuring investigator Eddie Margolis: Heartless (1986)  and Island of Steel (1988). Both published by William Morrow.

Stephen Paul Cohen is/was a real estate lawyer living in Minneapolis. His two private eye thrillers earned rave reviews in leading US publications. The New York Times called his writing “smart, desperate, gritty”. The Wall Street Journal gave it the ultimate praise:  “literate”.   I remember the emotional intensity of Cohen’s writing, something all we writers strive for.

Flipping through Cohen’s books 30 years later,  I realize that he’s writing noir – and nice juicy pulp fiction, too. The gritty street life he creates feels very real.  Just the same, he relies on many PI thriller tropes, which readers expected and wanted: Eddie Margolis, the hero, is a a desperate alcoholic who decides to avenge his best friend’s murder. He deals with corrupt rich and powerful men and beds deceitful dames. He’s betrayed by a lover. You know how it goes.

But that doesn’t mean the books are bad. Far from it. Genre publishers look for “the same but different”. By that criterion, Cohen’s books certainly deliver.

So what happened to Stephen Paul Cohen? There’s very little about him on the internet.  His books are available on Amazon.ca, but only as used copies.

One source of information is Allen J. Hubin’s review of Island of Steel on the Mystery File website.  Comments suggest that publishers may have dropped hard-boiled fiction in the early 1990s, because cozies sold better.  A fair observation, but I also believe that Cohen’s writing was ahead of its time. He was writing noir, which wasn’t popular then, but has since had a big resurgence .

I further suspect that unfavorable reviews may have played a part. In 1989, the year after Island of Steel came out, Cohen co-authored a speculative fiction thriller, Night Launch, with then Senator Jake Garn. The book should have been a slam dunk for both authors, but  Publishers Weekly gave it a thumbs down.  Did William Morrow drop Cohen because of that?

Ten years later, Cohen apparently tried writing again. His drug trade thriller, Jungle White, was published in Thailand by White Lotus Press, but not elsewhere. (Did Cohen move to Asia, the way a few of my friends have done?) A reviewer on the Things Asian website hated Jungle White so much he wrote a lengthy and damning review, renaming the book, “A White in the Jungle”.  I haven’t read it so I can’t comment either way.

All writers get the rare bad review. Most of the time the reader simply didn’t “get” the book. But when they feel compelled to vent to the whole world about it, I suspect a more self-centred motive is at play.  I have to ask the question: Did the Things Asian review make Cohen quit writing for good?

BOTTOM LINE:   My copies of Heartless and Islands of Steel are used Avon paperbacks, not first editions.  Prices on Abe Books, Amazon and Biblio range from $4 to $12.  Thierry value: $18.97US*

DECISION: Keep as rare books. 

*Thierry value = most outrageous price you can humanly get away with. Named in honor of Mr. Brainwash who sold old used T-shirts for $500+. (See Banksy’s documentary, Exit through the Gift Shop.)

 

 

 

SURREAL TRAPDOOR: Abandoned Buildings in Your Neighbourhood- Part 2

In January I blogged about the ivy-drowned mansion near our cottage  which was later salvaged…sort of.

Small town “haunted” mansion

But do such houses exist in Toronto? Yes, they do! And I’ve learned to spot them.

The obvious clues are boarded up or broken windows, wildly overgrown gardens, leaking roofs and guttering.  Though occasionally these signs can apply to a fully inhabited, sadly neglected house!

More subtle signs appear for vacant homes: usually the overgrown garden is a giveaway. No obvious cars, a sheen of dust on the windows, a dispirited ambience…Though someone somewhere is keeping up the basic maintenance to avoid destruction.

Water, sun and nature move swiftly to claim back the planet.

What fascinates me are the reasons why the house stands deserted. There are stories there. Did the owner grow too elderly or infirm? Turn away from the world because of heartbreak? Was there a family dispute? A lingering estate problem?

And what of this strange sight, spotted on a winter walk?

 

Has the hoarding become so extreme that it’s spilled onto the veranda? Or did someone clear it out for the junk removal service?

Definitely a story here!

 

 

 

URBEX: Toronto – Tout Est Possible!

red and blue abstract painting
URBEX!

It’s March and my thoughts turn to training for The Ride. If Toronto’s wild weather allows, mid-March means riding the real roads!

The 2021 Ride to Conquer is virtual once again, but training is real – and an escape from COVID.

And a chance to Urbex Toronto.  (Urbex = urban exploration.)

 

Spring this year promises to be mild and soon. I jumped on the bike the earliest since the inaugural 2008 ride and pulled off 13 km.

First snow drops

 

The Beltline trail proved to be treacherous. Crossing over the Iron Horse Bridge, I hit ice. It’s like hydroplaning in a car: don’t steer, don’t brake, don’t waver. Maintain speed and balance and hope to *$%# you make it over the next 50 feet.

 

I reached my beloved icon, Tout Est Possible – and happily contended with mere mud before retreating to dodging traffic on regular roads.

It turns out that the Beltline Tout Est Possible is only one of at least 20 such icons scattered throughout Toronto. Many appear in non-obvious locations in places like Sherwood Park, Nordheimer Ravine and Taylor Creek Park.

The artist remains unknown like Banksy since their work started appearing in 2011. I’m happy to report that when my fav got erased, the artist restored it before too long.

For a description of fellow cyclists’ full tour of the icons, see the blogTO article here.